Category: Smart Buys

94

Why LASIK Surgery Is The Best $4,225 I’ve Ever Spent

As I lay on the operating table with a laser moving towards my eyeball, I knew I’d made the right decision. Ok, maybe I didn’t know it in that precise moment of mingled excitement and low grade terror, but I certainly knew it about an hour later when I could see without glasses or contacts for the first time in 16 years. A little over two years ago, I decided to take the ocular plunge and get...

169

Why Buying A Chest Freezer Is Saving Us Serious Money

Last month, Mr. Frugalwoods and I made a startling discovery: we’ve been harboring an energy hog in our basement. When we bought our home three years ago, it came outfitted with a behemoth, aged refrigerator in the basement in addition to the newer, smaller fridge on the main floor. Huh, we thought at the time, a second fridge! Not a looker to be sure, but it was already there and we figured we could put...

209

How We Avoid Cable And Watch Free TV Online

Greeting fair Frugalwoods friends! It’s Mr. Frugalwoods here, making a rare appearance as author. I’m usually your trusty behind-the-scenes tech guy, but today I want to share our strategies for securing gratis TV. “Hold on, you don’t have cable?!?” Yep. Don’t have it. Never have and probably never will. We’re a cable TV executive’s worst nightmare. But fear not, fair tube viewer, Mrs. FW and I do watch TV. It’s just that it’s the free kind that’s...

92

Strategic Frugality and The Tale of Stormzilla

Sometimes, the most frugal option is to spend money. Don’t fall out of your chair or topple over your standing desk–it’s true! Indeed, it’s rare that I advocate for forking over cash, but there are instances where avoiding the cheapest choice translates into frugality in the long run. And that, my frugal weirdo friends, is strategic frugality–also known as the inherent division between the lofty frugal and the lowly cheapskate. To illustrate my point, enter exhibit A:...

105

7 Great Gifts For Frugal Weirdos

Frugal people are not easy to shop for. You’d think we would be seeing as we don’t buy things for ourselves very often. However, since we’re usually minimalists (to some degree) and disavowers of consumer culture, it’s actually quite tough to buy for the person who has nothing and wants nothing! Ok, so obviously we have something, but, you catch my drift. Every year our sweet families inquire as to what the Frugalwoods home would like for...

214

10 Shockingly Expensive Things We Own

The Frugalwoods home is primarily outfitted with discount Craigslist deals, garage sale goodies, and of course, great trash finds. If you’re a regular reader, please sit down before continuing to read. Brace yourself: there are a few things Mr. Frugalwoods and I have purchased brand new and, in some instances, not even on sale. GASP. Everyone still breathing? Ok, let’s continue. I thought it would be a revealing exercise to itemize our not so frugal fixtures and...

34

How We Saved $2,120 by Buying a Mattress Online

“People buy shoes online even though you can’t try them on… a mattress is no different, right?” Faced with buying a new mattress two years ago, I uttered these words to Mrs. Frugalwoods and then embarked on a frugal slumber experiment. My goal was to see if my wife and I could buy a mattress online, save tons of money, and still get a great night’s sleep. Let’s start at the beginning. Mrs. Frugalwoods is what we...

19

12 Ways to Get a Steal on Craigslist

When we bought our house two years ago, we had essentially no furniture. To give you an idea, I’d made my previous dresser out of cardboard boxes–so, we were faced with a pretty blank slate. Solution? Craigslist, make our own, garage sales, and the side of the road. But most especially, Craigslist–the font of incredible used goods. If you haven’t purchased new furniture recently (or ever), take a gander at the prices. Go ahead and look. Mortified? Horrified? I...

29

Do You Really Need That? Don’t Be Owned By Your Stuff!

Stuff is the lifeblood of the American Dream, apparently. Our culture inundates with the clarion call to buy, to spend. Whether we NEED the proffered product is a secondary, if not tertiary, purchasing determinant. I fail to understand this seemingly unique-to-Americans drive to consumption. People buy material goods they don’t need in order to fill houses that are too big and then feel pressure to move to ever-larger houses in order to perpetuate the cycle. And then there’s an entire industry...